Categories
Artifacts Photographs Postcards

Bats, Brooms & Black Cats

Rust University baseball team PI/1992.0001
Call Number: PI/1992.0001 (MDAH Collection)

Two things seems to be in the air right now: baseball and Halloween. Here’s a roundup of what’s been going on around the archives and history blogosphere on these two subjects:

Willie Mitchell's baseball glove MMH Collection 1974.60.1
Accession Number: 1974.60.1 (Museum of Mississippi History Collection)*

Baseball

 

Halloween

The Cooper Postcard Collection yielded the image of the Rust baseball team above and the Rose Hill Cemetery below…

Cooper Collection: Rose Hill Cemetery, Brookhaven PI/1992.0001
Call Number: PI/1992.0001 (MDAH Collection)

Here at the archives, we have many more baseball photographs, suject files, and books. There are also books on ghost stories and Mississippi folklore, and of course, cemetery records. Search the catalog to find holdings.

*The baseball glove from the Museum of Mississippi History collection pictured above belonged to William (Willie) Mitchell who was the first Mississippian to attain major league status. Mitchell was born on December 1, 1888, in Pleasant Grove, Mississippi. He attended Mississippi A & M College (now Mississippi State University) from 1906-1909 where he received All Southern honors as a baseball pitcher. Mitchell later played in the major leagues for the Cleveland Indians and the Detroit Tigers. He was inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame in 1966. A collection of correspondence and newspaper clippings concerning his induction into the Hall of Fame can be found in the Archives. For more information or to see the glove, contact Cindy Gardner or Nan Prince by email or by phone at 601-576-6850.

Categories
Artifacts Museums & Historic Sites

The Mummy Returns!

The State Historical Museum’s most famous attraction returns to the Old Capitol for the month of October! The Egyptian “mummy” (pictured above), that so many visitors came to see, was unfortunately discovered to be a fake in 1969. Charlotte Capers, director of MDAH at the time, wrote of the discovery, saying:

The shrunken Egyptian mummy which was the stellar attraction of the Mississippi State Historical Museum for many years was exposed as a fake, when Gentry W. Yeatman, an enterprising University of Mississippi medical student with an interest in archaeology, x-rayed the little lady for a paleo-pathology project and found her heart was full of nails. Further, her shoulders were built of boards, she had a German language newspaper in her foot, and over her liver was a fragment of The Milwaukee Journal for 1898. This discovery was a death blow to a cherished legend, and raised more questions than it answered.

(In the old exhibit photograph above, the X-rays are shown next to the mummy. You can see the boards and nails.)

Today, the origins of the “dummy mummy” are still unknown, though Capers, later on in her report, posited that it was constructed by a German immigrant in Milwaukee. The mummy then made its way to a Mississippi collector who included it with a collection of Native American artifacts acquired by the state around 1923.

The mummy now resides in storage, but from October 1-31 at the Old Capitol Museum in Jackson, you can see the dummy mummy for yourself! Located at 100 South State Street, the museum is open Tuesday-Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m., free of charge. Parking is behind the Old Capitol, off Amite St. For more information call 601-576-6920 or email the Old Capitol.

Source: Charlotte Capers, “Dummy Mummy,” The Delta Review, November-December 1969.

Categories
Artifacts Museums & Historic Sites

Dobro Guitar

Accession Number: 1982.21.1 (Museum of Mississippi History Collection)

This guitar from the collection of the Museum of Mississippi History belonged to Tobe Hudson, a blues player from Gholson, Mississippi (Noxubee County) who ordered it from Sears & Roebuck in 1932. To get a resonated sound, blues guitarists often put a syrup can top over the sound hole in their guitars. This particular model of guitar produced the desired sound with the built-on metal resonator.

Artifacts in the collection of the Museum of Mississippi History are available for viewing by appointment only. Please contact Cindy Gardner, Director of Collections or Nan Prince, Asst. Director of Collections by email to schedule an appointment.

Categories
Artifacts Museums & Historic Sites

Turn of the Century Dress

Accession Number: 1971.24.23ab (Museum of Mississippi History Collection)

This dress is part of the collection of historic clothing of the Museum of Mississippi History that spans the time period, 1780 – 1980. This particular dress is from the 1890s and is part of the John Abert Neilson Collection from Columbus (Lowndes County).

Artifacts in the collection of the Museum of Mississippi History are available for viewing by appointment only. Please contact Cindy Gardner, Director of Collections or Nan Prince, Asst. Director of Collections by email to schedule an appointment.

Categories
Artifacts Museums & Historic Sites

Winterville Mounds

Winterville Mounds, near Greenville (Washington County), is the site of a prehistoric ceremonial center built by a Native American civilization that thrived from about A.D. 1000 to 1450. The mounds, part of the Winterville society’s religious system, were the site of sacred structures and ceremonies.

This artifact, made by the Winterville society, is a reproduction of the famed Cahokia “Tippets Bean Pot.” It was deposited in a grave site on Mound B, and was found by Jeffrey Brain during excavations in 1967. Cahokia was a Native American community near present day St. Louis, Missouri. There was contact between Cahokia and Winterville around 1200 A.D., but the extent of interaction between the two sites is unknown.

MDAH now administers Winterville Mounds, located on Mississippi Highway 1, six miles north of the intersection of Highways 82 and 1 in Greenville, and it is open to the public daily from dawn to dusk. The museum is open Monday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1:30 p.m.-5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, please contact the Winterville staff by phone at 662-334-4684 or by email.